Can Theft Really Be Okay With Ali Baba?

Who doesn’t love, or even have heard of, the story of Ali Baba? Open sesame! For all the “Arabian Nights” tales, this one rings with us quite true in the sense that we should always seek opportunity, especially from those who don’t deserve it. Let’s face the truth here: Ali Baba was a thief. Plain and simple. But that’s not all to the story.

The Story of Ali Baba and the 40 Thieves

It basically went like this: Ali Baba discovered a secret lair belonging to 40 thieves as well as Ali Baba identity theftthe way to get into it by speaking the secret words “open sesame.” Now let’s make one thing known here — Ali Baba’s a poor woodcutter. Not a lot of money to go around there. So you can ask yourself this important question — what would you do?

Clearly, if you stumbled onto a vast treasure trove belonging to 40 thieves, you’d feel the urge to nab a great portion of that treasure for yourself and perhaps provide for a future for your son and slave girl whom you’d betroth in marriage. In other words, opportunity when discovered blindly should breed provision for the future of your family. So can you blame Ali Baba? Truthfully, we can’t.

Needless to say, those 40 thieves found out about Ali Baba’s apparent invasion of the secret lair, but were thwarted completely. Ali Baba, of course, kept the lair secret for many, many years, so as not to be in the same position as those 40 thieves. Obviously.

Was Ali Baba Justified?

Now that is a tough question…. It’s not like Ali Baba’s anything similar to other notorious thieves of our history and literature at all. But think about identity theft, for instance — an identity thief wouldn’t steal from other identity thieves! But either way you look at it, you’re still an identity thief! No way around it.

This then becomes a simple question of morality and not crime. Was it more or less ‘illegal’ for Ali Baba to do what he did? Probably not (up to interpretation). Did Ali Baba do the right thing, however? Hmm…. Let’s “open sesame” that gate for a discussion and see what all of you think about that.

Why Robin Hood Won’t Ever Commit Identity Theft

Here’s a profile on Robin of Locksley, also known as “Robin of the Hood” (or just Robin Hood) — the guy was a wealthy son of a lord sent to Jerusalem to fight for King Richard and then was captured by the denizens there only to escape and sail his way back to the mainland of England countless years later. The welcome party, though, wasn’t what he had expected when he found out that his home, along with his father, had been eradicated with nothing left to show for it, leaving nothing for Robin to call a home. So what does he do?

He Survives. This Is Why Identity Theft Isn’t Robin Hood!

Sure, he became a thief among many infamous thieves in history and literature. The Prince ofidentity theft robin hood Thieves, actually, living in Sherwood Forest without a home. Without blood relatives. His entire history was annihilated from existence by the Sheriff of Nottingham. Robin became a ruthless outlaw stricken with vengeance over the death of his father, conversing with a bunch of “merry men” like Little John, Friar Tuck, and Will Scarlet, pretty much in the same boat he’s in! But he most definitely is not a criminal committing identity theft.

The reason why is due to the man’s insistence to rob the rich and feed the poor. His investment is on the poor. Not himself. A criminal committing identity theft only cares about himself/herself and nobody else. Period.

We’re Pretty Sure Robin Hood Would, in Fact, Approve of Identity Theft Protection

After all, the Sheriff of Nottingham practically stole King Richard’s identity by usurping his authority and trying to run England all on his own! Even if you were to look at other variations of this story about Robin Hood, we could point the finger even more squarely on the snide Prince John (not “Little” John, that guy’s cool) for trying to even wear the king’s crown.

In a nutshell, we can say Robin Hood is identity theft protection!